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Stitching Therapy

Healing Sewing Stories

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Sewing Poll

What types of hand sewing do you find healing? Answer this poll - Share your story

My hands are getting anxious to hold a pair of knitting needles in them. Fall and winter tend to be my "sewing seasons" but no season is off limits for me to start up a new sewing project and indulge in a little stitching therapy. Yesterday I went shopping with my mother to Hobby Lobby in search of some yarn. Nothing jumped out at me, nor was there a sale going on so I've decided to hold off for a bit. But, I discovered a knitting pattern that struck my fancy, so at least I have a new project in mind.

Mom is currently crocheting an afghan, she enjoys keeping her hands active while she watches her favorite baseball team (the Cardinals!) on television. Fellow About.com associate, Barbara Crews (Collectibles Guide) meets each week with a knitting circle. Sounds like fun! Other Guides across the network have also given me permission to share their healing sewing stories here (see below). Answer my poll and read the stories (or tell your story), then start rummaging through your sewing basket and start a healing project!

Healing Sewing Stories

Connie G. Barwick, About Guide to Cross-Stitch, says "A few minutes stitching takes all my worries away and makes me breathe easier. "

Janet Wickell, About Guide to Quilting, says "When my daughter was young, I always had a basket in the car, packed with projects I could work on when I waited for her to get out of dance class, flute lessons and all of the other 'mom on hold' tasks. Now I don't seem to make time for hand sewing, and it truly is one of the most relaxing things you can do."

Kari Diehl, About.com Guide to Scandinavian Food, says "Two years ago, I received a call that my wonderful Mother - who lives 2000 miles away - had been admitted to the hospital for emergency brain surgery (she'd developed two subdural hematomas after a fall off a chair). She and Dad told me not to fly home, leaving me nothing to do but worry. Not knowing if they would shave her head or not, I decided to relearn the crochet skills she had so lovingly taught me three decades ago and make her a hat. The needle and yarn felt like a rosary in my hands. (Mom's fine, by the way - and I've progressed from crocheting to knitting on a daily basis. It's the best cure for stress and anxiety I've ever found)."

Amber J. Tresca, About.com Guide to Inflammatory Bowel Disease, says "Before I had kids I did a lot of needlework. When I was a teenager I was hospitalized several times for my ulcerative colitis. My mom got me some needlepoint kits -- one was of Nefertiti and one was of King Tut. I had (still have) a great interest in Ancient Egyptian art and culture. I finished them while I was in the hospital, and it was a soothing escape when I was tied to an IV pole and didn't have energy to do much else. I wasn't eating (I was receiving nutrients through my IV) and watching TV was difficult because of the number of food commercials. My mother had my work handsomely blocked and framed. They are hanging in my bedroom today. They represent my ability to persevere. Whenever I move I tell my movers that the box containing my framed needlework is sacred, and it is one of the few things I own that I would cry over were it damaged."

Bonny Albo, About.com Guide to Dating, says " I attended a karma yoga retreat a few years back after a particularly bad breakup. One rainy night a bunch of us got together and another attendee taught us all how to knit. Once I got the hang of it (it took a few hours at most) I went out and bought myself a beautiful hand dyed wool kit to make a lightweight and cozy shawl. It took me most of the retreat to finish it, but I still wear it on special occasions and get compliments galore. That experience fostered a love for knitting and now I've got a huge stash to draw upon anytime. I see knitting as meditation, and feel off if I don't knit for a while."

Also See: My Mom's Button Jar

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